Studio 20 professor joins CNN as lead producer

Congrats to Studio 20’s Professor Jason Samuels who recently left BET to join CNN as a lead producer for CNN’s award-winning, long-form documentary unit ‘In America” - which strives to present untold stories in underreported communities. Professor Samuels’ first prime time documentary for CNN will air in the fall.  Learn more about CNN’s “In America” here.

Studio 20 Professor wins another NAMIC Vision Award

Studio 20 Professor Jason Samuels won a NAMIC Vision Award for Best Sports for ESPN’s “James Stewart: King of the Hill"  feature, which Samuels produced.

The NAMIC Awards honor multi-ethnicity in communication and recognize programming that has aired on television and digital platforms that is reflective of the depth and breadth of the lives, spirit, and contributions of people of color.

Studio 20 professor wins two awards

Studio 20 Professor Jason Samuels picked up two first place awards from the New York Association of Black Journalists earlier this week.  

His primetime special on BET on the death of Michael Jackson won the first place award in the TV Arts and Entertainment category. And his primetime documentary on BET on the dropout crisis in America’s public schools - “Heart of the City: Detroit’s Drop Our Factories” - won the first place award in the Education category. 

Studio 20 professor quoted on ABC’s staff reductions

Studio 20 Professor Jason Samuels is quoted in Wednesday’s New York Times about the impact of dramatic staff reductions at ABC news. From the article:

Jason Samuels, an associate professor of journalism at New York University and a former senior producer at ABC, said Tuesday’s move “makes sense,” but added, “ultimately the pressure to continue churning out network quality news with a pared-down staff is a recipe for burnout.”

Read the full story.

Studio 20 Professor Jason Samuels' television experience includes working as senior producer at ABC News Digital.

The Online Journalism Review talked with him about his role and how producing newscasts for the web is different from producing for broadcast:

OJR: Could you give me one example where the storytelling underscores how different it is from the 6:30 broadcast?

Samuels: Sure, I’ll first go over just the nuts and bolts. It’s essentially a 15-minute, commercial-free show every day that we tape live with Charles Gibson as the anchor. The first two and half minutes are the meat-and-potato headlines—the traditional network news fare. The rest of the show has pieces that can be on the news of the day but they can also be like features.

As an example, though, correspondents usually go out to cover stories; they write a script, edit it and put it together for the broadcast. But I tell them to just shoot a video blog. So in today’s show, Miguel Marquez in Los Angeles was assigned to do a story for the broadcast about the new line of Bible-themed action figures that are going to be sold in Wal-Mart. So when you watch the broadcast tonight it’s going to be a traditional, well-crafted 1:30 to 2-minute piece. What we asked him to do is that when you are at Wal-Mart and you are reporting your piece for the broadcast, just stand there, hold up these action figures and just tell us about them. Don’t script anything perfectly just give us your own impression and your sense of what is the story. Miguel filed a video blog piece that is about a minute long for our webcast. It’s a little less formal, it’s a little more raw and I would argue in some ways it is a little more real.

It is less polished but I think younger people are willing to accept that and almost prefer that instead of showing what’s packaged so perfectly.

Now if there is a piece for the broadcast that we are interested in, we will put that on our webcast as well. For example there is a piece for broadcast tonight about a woman who has homeless kids taking photos of what they wish to aspire to. And it’s a wonderful piece that should be interesting no matter how old you are. We’ve put that into our webcast.

Another example. We did an interview for the webcast exclusively with Christopher Hitchens, on his book, “God is Not Great.” We sat him down in front of a camera and we had him basically talk about the themes in his books and we edited that down into an essay. That would never go on the evening news shows but for us it worked. It’s provocative and it’s different.

Check out the full interview.

Studio 20 is off to a roaring spring semester start. Professor Jason Samuels has started lining up guests, including Emmy Award-winning video producer for The Washington Post Travis Fox. “His distinctive web video and multimedia stories have been instrumental in establishing a new form of multimedia storytelling on the Internet,” said Samuels.

More Studio 20 news will be announced soon.

Studio 20 is off to a roaring spring semester start. Professor Jason Samuels has started lining up guests, including Emmy Award-winning video producer for The Washington Post Travis Fox. “His distinctive web video and multimedia stories have been instrumental in establishing a new form of multimedia storytelling on the Internet,” said Samuels.

More Studio 20 news will be announced soon.

Studio 20 Professor Named Executive Producer of State of the Union live coverage

Jason SamuelsStudio 20 Professor Jason Samuels has been named the executive producer of the BET news’ live coverage of President Barack Obama’s 2010 State of the Union address. In this role, Professor Samuels will oversee two hours of special live coverage which will air on BET, BET HD, and BET International, including live analysis and an in-depth look back at President Obama’s first year in office through the eyes of black America.


More details to come.